Tag Archives: Washington University

Preserving the History of the Civil Rights Era Seminar

African American Memory: Preserving the History of the Civil Rights Era
Summer Seminar for Middle School and High School Teachers
July 22 – 25, 2014 at Washington University

The Washington University African and African American Studies Program and the University Libraries is accepting applications for a summer seminar. The university will invite ten St. Louis-area middle school and high school educators to study the complex issues surrounding the history and artifacts of the Civil Rights Era.

Led by university faculty, this four-day seminar will provide an in-depth exploration of Washington University’s special collections, including the archives of Henry Hampton, creator of the acclaimed documentary series Eyes on the Prize. In addition, curriculum topics, such as defining the Civil Rights Era, primary source research, visual literacy, preserving the materials and memory of the marginalized, and the rise and fall of the American city will be discussed. Teachers will be introduced to a variety of teaching resources and methods that will enable them to engage students with greater intellectual power. The learning outcomes of African American Memory: Preserving the History of the Civil Rights Era include:

  • Broader understanding of Civil Rights Era history
  • Overview of the latest theories and trends in Civil Rights Era scholarship
  • Increased awareness of locally and digitally available resources
  • Introduction to visual literacy, including the learning potential of historically disregarded cultural material

Sessions will be conducted by faculty, curators and community specialists, including:

  • Dr. Gerald Early, Merle Kling Professor of Modern Letters, Professor of English and of African and Afro-American Studies, Washington University
  • Dr. Jonathan Fenderson, Assistant Professor of Afro-American Studies, Washington University
  • Dr. Stefan M. Bradley, Director and Associate Professor of African American Studies, Saint Louis University

If accepted, participants receive a $300 stipend and will be expected to:

  • Attend the seminar in its entirety and complete associated readings
  • Incorporate takeaways in their teaching
  • Provide feedback on the seminar as a whole and share any subsequent applications of the knowledge gained

To apply, please submit this application to Nadia Ghasedi, Head of the Visual Media Research Lab, at nghasedi@wustl.edu, by July 1. Required for consideration:

  • A completed application, including a paragraph describing your interest in the seminar and how your participation will impact your students
  • A résumé, including two references

As a follow-up to the four-day summer seminar, fall workshop sessions may also be held, if funding permits, for which an additional stipend will be offered. Summer participants will be encouraged to apply.  More information about the fall workshops will be forthcoming later this summer. Please direct questions to nghasedi@wustl.edu.

Kemper Museum Community Day Approaching

kemperFor their annual spring Community Day, the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum is partnering with the Japan America Society of St. Louis.

This open-house celebration will offer interactive art experiences for all ages including a traditional Japanese tea ceremony, ikebana demonstrations (Japanese flower arrangement), Kamishibai (Japanese storytelling), and a Hina Doll presentation. Community Day is funded in part by a grant from the Women’s Society of Washington University and takes place March 22 from 11 am-3 pm.

Education for Change Conference Takes Place in February

ESJ Conference Flyer 2014 -1Educators for Social Justice (ESJ) is a group of K-12 teachers, community educators, university faculty, students and citizens from a wide range of institutions and organizations across the metro-St. Louis region. The group is committed to exploring and acting on the relationship between literacy and social justice in classrooms, schools, and communities.

Their annual Education for Change Conference is February 21-22 at Maplewood-Richmond Heights Elementary School. The theme this year is “Race, Class & Education in St. Louis.” The keynote speaker is Sister Mary Antona Ebo. She  was among the Civil Rights activists who traveled to Selma, Alabama, in the spring of 1965 to march for voting rights for African Americans.

Breakout session speakers include:
• Tiffany Wang, Diversity Awareness Partnership
• Vanessa Conway, MIRA
• Charlotte Ejay, Director of People Personnel and Diversity for Parkway School District
• Aaron Jennings & interns, Washington University’s Brown School of Social Work
• Phil Hunsberger & Billie Mayo, Educational Equity Consultants and April Fulstone, Wydown Middle School

Learn more at educatorsforsocialjustice.org

‘Tech in a Northern Town’

Guest post by Amy K. Marshall. Library Director of The Craig Public Library in Craig, Alaska. Amy recently participated in a videconference- her first- with Cooperating School Districts’ and the Kemper Art Museum. Amy shared the experience with us:

I’m showing my age here, but I’ve always loved that catchy tune from the one-hit-wonder The Dream Academy: Life In A Northern Town. We don’t have a Salvation Army Band, but it is, for the most part, a staid life in Craig, Alaska on Prince of Wales Island.  People fish, hunt, gather berries and other resources—there is a strong subsistence-based population here. If you came to visit, you might not notice it so much, except when the herring are spawning and everything is “Fish Egg” Excitement like it is, well, this week!

Into this place, technology has touched a toe to the water. The Craig Public Library, thanks to the generosity of the AlaskaOWL Project (and the US Department of Commerce, The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Rasmuson Foundation, and other contributors) is linked! The first link came with the installation of a T1 Broadband connection. The second link came with the installation of videoconferencing equipment that truly opened the world for the Prince of Wales Island Community. That the purveyors of the AlaskaOWL thought to train library personnel for the installation and use of the equipment is nothing short of inspired. And, when librarians from around the State of Alaska converged on The Golden Heart City of Fairbanks for the AKLA Conference in February, the AlaskaOWL Team had one more surprise for us: CILC.

“It’s there for you to use.” Alaska State Library’s Head of Development Sue Sheriff’s simple statement rang out as nearly a challenge for all the librarians in the room. We now have the technology. We need to put it to work for our communities and videoconferencing was one way in which to do that.

The first videoconference the Craig Public Library conducted was with the Mildred Kemper Art Museum: “History, Heroes, and Symbolism: A Visual Analysis of George Caleb Bingham’s Iconic Painting,” I was terrified. I know my patronage, and I knew there would be people who would want to be there for it, but I also had that butterflies-in-the-stomach feeling hostesses get when they realize they could be planning a party that no one will attend. I should never have worried. And, when Anchor Point out on the Kenai Peninsula, 750 miles away, joined us, the party stretched more than 3,000 miles across the Earth. Groups of people separated by these distances were able to see one another and exchange ideas: that is the power of this technology.

Our host, Allison Taylor, led us through a discussion of the painting, pointing out other period-specific works of art from which Bingham drew inspiration. We talked about the use of propaganda in art, how what was propaganda at the time could be viewed through the lens of history and somewhat softened (or not) depending upon the subject matter. What Allison probably did not realize, although she could see us talking, was that, when we politely muted our microphone on the Craig end, there were three or four in the group who were telling other stories, gesturing to the painting and scribbling notes. It was a far better party than I had imagined.

And now … a poem. As I watched eyes widen around the tables in Craig and Anchor Point, I thought, no one’s going to come to another party again. It was a writing exercise—for us to write an Ekphrastic Poem. We had fun with the word, because it’s so fun to say, but it is, in the end, a poem inspired by a work of art. Allison led us through it, and I was happy to see everyone scribbling notes, setting down words, following the instructions, heads bent, eyes narrowed, scanning the picture for colors, shapes, objects, for movements (no “ing” verbs allowed), implied or otherwise.

“Now,” Alison said, still smiling, “I want you to write five sentences or so, and link your nouns to your verbs in ways you wouldn’t expect.”

Here’s mine:

Rifles set at shoulders
Grey-blue skies billow as a
Shadow’d bird leans into the wind.
Branches brown and broken
Whip away the sun in set
As light glows against the
Red and brown of horse-borne hope.

After the videoconference ended and we all waved good-bye from our respective locations, the group around the tables in Craig remained rooted. We all shared our poems. We all shared our thoughts on the experience. We talked for over half an hour past the time of the video conference. Around us, other patrons drifted in to use the public use computers, to thumb through magazines, to take in the view of Klawock Inlet… and I knew they were there, but in that moment, there was just… us. There’s something about a shared experience. There’s something about creating anything in a group—be it a poem, a story, a building, or a fresh-baked pie. There’s a greater understanding of it. You see a collective process—how each individual approaches it. You’re better for it. That’s also the power of the tech and of presenters like Allison and programs like that of the Mildred Kemper Art Museum. We’re all better for it.

From Page to Stage: HEC-TV Live! Presents The Giver

Date: Wednesday, January 5, 2011

Times: 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. Central Time

Grade Levels:  5-10

Cost:  NO CHARGE


The Giver: From Page to Stage,” this free, interactive videoconference will give your students a chance to talk in depth with the director, designers, actors, and technical staff from Metro Theater Company on how they are translating the world of Lois Lowry’s novel to the stage for their upcoming production at Edison Theatre in St. Louis, Missouri. Lois Lowry’s Newbery Medal winning novel The Giver continues to be read and loved by thousands of young people each year.

In this final of a series of four HEC-TV Live! programs focusing on the novel (image above is from the third in the series- click it to watch!), students will have the unique opportunity to join us live from the stage of the Edison Theatre on the campus of Washington University in St. Louis where Eric Coble’s adaptation is being staged.  See the set. View a scene from the production.  How do you adapt the timeless story of The Giver to be “seen by an audience” rather than “imagined by a reader?”  How do you take a world without color and music from the page to the stage?  Meet director Carol North and members of the design team to discuss how the show came to life from the first phase of design to the final phase of implementation.  View the lights, the costumes, and the scenery.  Ask your questions of actors about how they formulated and performed their character.  How would you choose to illustrate the themes of the story through a stage design and directorial point of view?  Compare your ideas to those of the Metro Theater Company and Edison Theatre staff staging this new production.

You may enroll by contacting live@hectv.org or calling 314-531-4455. Once enrolled, teachers will receive the program’s preparatory and evaluation materials. Please register by December 22, 2010: provide your school name, teacher name, tech contact name, email, phone and IP address.