Tag Archives: United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda

“Propaganda is a truly terrible weapon in the hands of an expert.”  – Adolf Hitler, 1924

propaganda image On Saturday, February 28, educators are invited to explore content and themes from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s traveling exhibition State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda (opening at the Missouri History Museum in April).

This one-day workshop, Connecting Past and Present: A New Framework for Teaching Propaganda and Media Literacy, will be at the Missouri History Museum and offers teachers unique strategies for helping students engage with historical propaganda and view messages they encounter today with a more critical eye. The history of the Holocaust highlights the danger of propaganda and how societies can become vulnerable to extreme messages. As the Missouri History Museum notes on their website, this most extreme case study emphasizes why the issue of propaganda matters and challenges citizens to actively question, analyze and seek the truth.

Classroom-ready teaching resources will be modeled and shared. This workshop is free of charge and is appropriate for middle and high school teachers from diverse disciplines. No previous experience teaching about the Holocaust is required. Educators specializing in language arts, media, history, information literacy and current events are especially encouraged to participate in this important discussion on history and media literacy.

To register, please visit mohistory.org/teacherpd. For more information, contact United States Holocaust Memorial Museum’s Sonia Booth. For a flyer of the event, click on Teacher Workshop-St.Louis.

This workshop has been made possible by the generous support of The Marcus Foundation. The State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda exhibit runs April 11 – September 7, 2015 in St. Louis.

[Image: from a poster for the film S.A. Mann Brand, 1933. Kunstbibliothek Berlin/BPK, Berlin/Art Resource, New York]

Learn More About the Post-War Lives of Holocaust Survivors

Did you know that after the Holocaust, the British government provided aid to over 700 child survivors? At least 20 of these children came under the nurturing care of Alice Goldberger, a German immigrant who fled to the United Kingdom at the outset of the war, at a children’s home called Weir Courtney. Hundreds of their writings and drawings—depicting happy scenes from their postwar lives—were donated to the United State Holocaust Memorial Museum by one of Alice’s former wards. Learn the extraordinary story behind these seemingly ordinary pages and the Museum’s efforts to preserve them from archivist Rebecca Erbelding of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. This is a free public lecture and Ms. Erbelding will be showing the children’s art in a PowerPoint presentation format. Here’s a bit more information:

CHILDREN’S DRAWINGS OF WEIR COURTNEY
Co-Sponsored by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and
The Holocaust Museum and Learning Center of St. Louis

Sunday, March 23 at 1:00 pm
Jewish Federation Kopolow Building
Holocaust Museum and Learning Center
12 Millstone Campus Drive, St. Louis, Missouri

Please RSVP by Friday, March 21.

Entries Sought From Students for Holocaust Art and Writing Contest

Students are invited to use their creativity to express the difficult and inspiring lessons of the Holocaust in this contest from the St. Louis Holocaust Museum and Learning Center.  Topics may include:

• Acts of courage and heroism
• Resistance and rescue
• The consequences of indifference
• Persecution, intolerance and injustice
• Preserving humanity in situations of great adversity
• History and lessons of the Holocaust

There will be two divisions for both the Art and Writing categories; a student may submit only one entry in each category. There are two divisions: division 1 will include grades 6–8, division 2 will include grades 9–12.

Students may write a poem, newspaper article, story, play/dialogue or essay for the writing contest. Students may create a sculpture, drawing, photograph, painting, poster, collage or 5-minute video or DVD for the art contest.  All charcoal, chalk and pastels must be treated with fixatives; for safety reasons, art (painting or sculpture) may not include real barbed wire, jagged glass or plastic.

The museum encourages teachers to use the  “Guidelines for Teaching the Holocaust” provided by the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC, which are posted on their website at www.ushmm.org.

This form is required for submission: ArtWriteEntry2014.