Tag Archives: social studies

World War I, 100 Years Later

@IBTIMESUK PHOTO

July 28, 2014 marks the centennial of the start of World War I. A wealth of information and resources is available online, including archives from Kansas City’s National World War I Museum and a collection from the British Library that includes over 500 sources from European historians. Several photographers have superimposed photos from the past with the places of the present. Do take some time today to look over these resources and reflect upon the lives lost during this time.

Freedom Riders Commemorate 50th Anniversary of Civil Rights Act of 1964 with Bus Ride

A half-century ago, courageous civil rights activists rode Greyhound and Trailways buses into the segregated South, enduring brutal beatings by the Ku Klux Klan, fire bombings and the wrath of Birmingham (Alabama) Public Safety Commissioner Eugene “Bull” Connor. They came to be known as “Freedom Riders.”

On Wednesday, to commemorate the 50th anniversary of President Lyndon B. Johnson signing the Civil Rights Act of 1964, some of those same Freedom Riders will board buses in front of the Lyndon Baines Johnson Department of Education Building for a symbolic and celebratory returning freedom ride.

Continue reading here to learn more from the U.S. Department of Education and follow #CivilRightsRide.

Democratizing the DBQ

Nationally, teachers and students are using The DBQ Project methods and materials starting in the 4th grade and sometimes even younger. The DBQ Project promotes reading and writing about complex texts in social studies but our goal is to make these rigorous skills engaging and worthwhile.

  1. All students need to learn how to think
  2. Learning to think requires practice
  3. Thinking is hard work
  4. Thinking is clarified by writing
  5. Thinking is for everyone

This hands-on introductory workshop on June 25 at EducationPlus will show you how to structure the DBQ for young and inexperienced readers and writers. Learn how you can integrate literacy strategies into social studies content areas to ensure that students learn to grapple with historical questions as they learn to read, write, and think. This workshop is open to anyone but it will particularly focus on helping teachers reach young or reluctant learners.

Presenter: Beth Montgomery is Co-Director of Professional Development and Partnerships for The DBQ Project. Beth has extensive experience working with educators on closing the achievement gap, technology integration, and reading and writing in the history classroom.

Big History Comes to Forest Park

Big History integrates the insights of the sciences with the humanities into lessons designed for students to think about the past and future.  According to Big History, by sharing “the big picture” and challenging students to explore the relationship between key events over time, Big History ultimately helps young people develop key critical thinking skills and the ability to better synthesize and apply complex information.

Are you looking for ways to integrate technology with the world history classroom, critical thinking, reading like a historian, making an argument and the Common Core?

You are invited to learn the answers to these questions on March 12, and to hear from teachers and creators of Big History why educators love the Big History Project for 9th and 10th grade history students.  And don’t miss the opportunity to meet Bob Bain, Professor of Education, University of Michigan and contributor to the Big History Project, and partake in drinks and hors d’oeuvres at the Forest Park Visitor Center. This event is bring your own device optional, and in partnership with Forest Park Forever & Big History.

This after school event is free, but registration is required.

Study Abroad this Summer | Teacher Tour of Turkey

The Turkish Cultural Foundation and the World Affairs Councils of America have developed a three-part program on Turkey, with a special emphasis on Turkish culture- modern and historic- to American students and teachers.

The first part of the program is a workshop for teachers taking place March 8, 2014 from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.  Interested educators must attend the Saturday seminar in order to participate in the Study Tour of Turkey, the second part of the program.  The St. Louis group’s Study Tour consists of a 12-day stay in Turkey during the summer of 2014, and will also include about 55 teachers from other parts of the country.  The third and final portion is during the fall of 2014, and consists of programs highlighting Turkish culture and history. Study Tour teachers are expected to participate in developing these programs.

The March 8 workshop at the University of Missouri-St. Louis is free, and includes lunch and parking fees. Prior registration is required. To be eligible to apply for the Study Tour in Turkey this summer, teachers must meet the following criteria:

• Currently employed full-time as a classroom humanities, art, or literature teacher, media specialist or principal for grades 6-12 in the St. Louis area (or bordering region) and will be employed full-time as a classroom teacher, media specialist or principal in grades 6-12 next year
• Possess a valid U.S. passport and/or ability to acquire a U.S. passport upon notification of acceptance for the trip
• Provide the $800 registration fee toward the cost of the trip, and travel to Chicago at your own expense. In addition to these expenses, teachers are advised by the Turkish Cultural Foundation to budget approximately $100 for tips to guides and drivers and approximately $25 for visa fees
• Not resided in or traveled to Turkey during the past seven years

For more information about this program or to register for the preliminary seminar, please contact the World Affairs Council of St. Louis at (314) 727-9988 .