Tag Archives: Parkway School District

Ladue and Parkway Educators Receive International Recognition Award for ‘Making IT Happen’ in Educational Technology

Educators Don Goble (Ladue) and Bill Bass (Parkway) has been honored with the coveted Making IT Happen award for their contributions to the successful integration of technology in education. The Making IT Happen award is provided by the International Society for Technology in Education, of which METC is an affiliate.

The Making IT Happen award honors outstanding educators and leaders who demonstrate extraordinary commitment, leadership, courage and persistence in improving digital learning opportunities for students. Since its inception in 1995 more than 500 educators from around the world have received the award.

“Making IT Happen honorees make unique contributions to advancing the use of digital technology to inspire learning and teaching,” said ISTE CEO Brian Lewis. “Their significant accomplishments all further ISTE’s vision of a world in which all learners thrive, achieve and contribute.”

Don Goble, MIH Teacher Winner, cropped
Don Goble

Don Goble is an award-winning Broadcast Technology, Film and Multimedia Instructor at Ladue Horton Watkins High School. He has spent countless hours teaching students and peers how to effectively utilize multi-media and appreciate media literacy. Don speaks nationally, offering educators innovative ways to incorporate video into the classroom. Mr. Goble advocates for technology and digital media in the classroom by blogging for national education publications, offering professional development to staff and schools all over the country, and by serving as a media creator himself. Mr. Goble was a part of the 2011 Apple Distinguished Educator class and named the Journalism Education Association 2015 Broadcast Adviser of the Year. Besides keynote presentations, workshops, breakout sessions, Ignite talks, TED Talks, and a multitude of professional development, Don supports the METC ISTE Affiliate through coordinating the METC Student eNews Bureau and news / media coverage of the Gateway2Change, a Student Summit on Race.

 

Bill Bass, MIH Leader Winner
Bill Bass

In the Parkway School District, Bill Bass leads professional development opportunities for teachers including a number of technology academies and classes. He has taken those classes and created systemic opportunities for teachers to learn on their own time through virtual classes. He helped to create the EdTech master’s program at Missouri Baptist University where he serves as an adjunct professor. Bill is a regular speaker at local and national conferences, serves on the METC Advisory Committee, and helps to organize the Missouri Summit featuring Google for Education. In all his work, Bill seeks to empower teachers so that they are comfortable and confident in their ability to use the tools in the classroom. Bill’s influence goes far beyond Missouri as he is the President of the ISTE Innovative Learning PLN, has written two books and numerous chapters and articles highlighting and advocating for the use of technology for students.

 

Successful integration of educational technology requires a common passion, initiative and pledge that can best be summarized by the Making IT Happen Formula of Success:

  1. Educators and leaders who apply available technology now
  2. Move forward and don’t look back
  3. See students as real people
  4. Teach through relationships by inspiring, encouraging, and nurturing
  5. Recognize that further change is necessary, but understand that it is a process
  6. Realize that teacher empowerment is the key element to technology integration
  7. Expect success
  8. Motivate through awareness and access to information

Both educators join a prestigious group of Making IT Happen honorees, including classroom teachers, school principals, superintendents, corporate executives, legislators, governors, and more.  

About Making IT Happen

Founded in 1995, the Making IT Happen program highlights the dramatic role educators have on the learning process by using technology and rewards those individuals for their commitment and innovation. To date, more than 500 individuals have been awarded this recognition through ISTE and its affiliates. The impact of this program has been felt at hundreds of conferences around the world. The focus of the Making IT Happen program is on current practitioners, highlighting their significant contribution and encouraging them to continue their work.

About ISTE

The International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE®) is the premier nonprofit organization serving educators and education leaders committed to empowering connected learners in a connected world. ISTE serves more than 100,000 education stakeholders throughout the world.

Innovative offerings include the ISTE Conference & Expo – the world’s most comprehensive ed tech event – as well as the widely adopted ISTE Standards for learning, teaching and leading in the digital age. The organization’s robust suite of professional learning resources features online courses, consulting services for schools and districts, books, and peer-reviewed journals and publications. For more information, visit iste.org. Connect with ISTE via Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. 

For more information, media only:
Jodie Pozo-Olano, Chief Communications Officer, 804-986-6911, jpozoolano@iste.org

Lisa Wolfe, L. Wolfe Communications, 773-278-2800, lwolfe@lwolfe.com

Flipped Learning: Gateway to Student Engagement | METC Book Review

flippedbookThe Midwest Education Technology Community Conference advisory committee is excited to bring back book reviews of materials that we will offer at the conference this February. Two area educators volunteered to read and review Flipped Learning: Gateway to Student Engagement. This book, an ISTE publication, has identified its audience as administrators, curriculum coordinators, educators (6-12) and technology coordinators.

Have you read this book? Here’s what our reviewers had to say:

Reviewed by Angela Cartee, Professional Learning Technology Specialist, Special School District
What is the best use of face-to-face time with students? That’s the one question posed by Jonathon Bergmann and Aaron Sams in their newest book Flipped Learning: Gateway to Student Engagement. Is it inquiry? Problem Solving? Discussions? Problem-based Learning? Guided Practice? Direct Instruction? The answer is,“yes!” There is no one answer because flipped learning is not a set process or a single strategy. It is a transformation that focuses on learning rather than teaching.

The authors offer a deeper understanding of what flipped learning is, the benefits and implementation ideas. This book is a “why to” that answers many pedagogical questions about instruction. It offers a deeper explanation of individualized learning and learner-centric classrooms. If you’re looking for more (and better) ways to integrate technology into the classroom, you’ll find them here.

Transforming classrooms, faculty meetings, or professional development sessions can be difficult; however, this book offers scenarios and suggestions to keep you thinking.

Reviewed by Eve Diehl, Library Media Specialist, Parkway School District
In this book, Jonathon Bergmann and Aaron Sams first remind readers of the basic idea of the “flipped classroom,” in which direct instruction is given primarily through videos that students access outside of the class time, while in-class time is used for activities traditionally considered to be homework. The main focus of the book is to inspire teachers to move beyond these basics to the concept of “flipped learning,” which extends the idea of the flipped classroom. The introductory chapters describe some of the philosophy behind flipped learning and the key components that need to be present in the classroom to meet the model. The authors introduce us to the “One Question” that guides the flipped learning model, “What is the best use of face-to-face time with students?”

The book emphasizes the idea that flipped learning is a grassroots approach to educational reform. It is something meaningful that teachers can do to transform their classrooms, without depending upon a mandate from above. This is illustrated through the subsequent chapters of the book as we hear personal stories from teachers all over the country who are finding success with the flipped learning model. The stories come from a wide variety of content areas, including social studies, English and even physical education. The teachers reflect on the “One Question,” and all teachers in the book conclude that direct instruction is not the best use of face-to-face time; they realize that in-class time is more effective when it is student-centered, not teacher-centered.

One appealing aspect of all the personal stories is that they seem attainable since the teachers implement the flipped learning model through a gradual process. The teachers start off Year 1 at the basic “flipped classroom” level, where they mainly focus on making videos. Then, in subsequent years, they all realize the need to take the model further into flipped learning, which involves different things for different teachers and content areas. Some of the characteristics of flipped learning include allowing students to move through content at their own pace, demonstrating mastery of a topic in creative ways, interacting with and teaching peers and developing stronger relationships with their teachers so individual learning needs are met. This book provides a strong mix of theory and practice that will enable teachers to put the flipped classroom to work right away at whatever level they feel comfortable.

Purchase this book, and others, at METC. Or, order beforehand (at a discounted rate) and pick up your new reads at the conference.

Education for Change Conference Takes Place in February

ESJ Conference Flyer 2014 -1Educators for Social Justice (ESJ) is a group of K-12 teachers, community educators, university faculty, students and citizens from a wide range of institutions and organizations across the metro-St. Louis region. The group is committed to exploring and acting on the relationship between literacy and social justice in classrooms, schools, and communities.

Their annual Education for Change Conference is February 21-22 at Maplewood-Richmond Heights Elementary School. The theme this year is “Race, Class & Education in St. Louis.” The keynote speaker is Sister Mary Antona Ebo. She  was among the Civil Rights activists who traveled to Selma, Alabama, in the spring of 1965 to march for voting rights for African Americans.

Breakout session speakers include:
• Tiffany Wang, Diversity Awareness Partnership
• Vanessa Conway, MIRA
• Charlotte Ejay, Director of People Personnel and Diversity for Parkway School District
• Aaron Jennings & interns, Washington University’s Brown School of Social Work
• Phil Hunsberger & Billie Mayo, Educational Equity Consultants and April Fulstone, Wydown Middle School

Learn more at educatorsforsocialjustice.org

Common Core State Standards and Understanding by Design Summer Institute Brings Together Area Educators

#CCSSUbDOur first Common Core State Standards and Understanding by Design Summer Institute– a collaboration with the St. Louis Area Curriculum Coordinators Association (SLACCA) and Authentic Education- was a great success this week at the Fox School District. Educators from several Missouri districts, including, but not limited, to Kirkwood, Ladue, Parkway and Rockwood, attended three days of professional learning. Another three-day session of the CCSS & UbD Institute takes place July 8-10 at the Ritenour School District. Learn more at www.edplus.org/wiggins  www.csd.org/wiggins. More photos from the June session will be posted to Flickr; you can read some of the thoughts shared by following the #CCSSUbD hashtag on Twitter.

The Pedagogy and Production of Media Literacy

Julie Smith during small group discussion at Media Literacy Week 2012
Julie Smith during Media Literacy Week 2012

The Education Community Engagement Committee of GMLP is hosting the Gateway Media Literacy Partners Mini Conference: Pedagogy and Production at Cooperating School Districts on June 7 from 7:30 a.m.- 12:30 p.m.

St. Louis educators Don Goble (Ladue School District) and Julie Smith (SIUE and Webster University) will keynote this event, followed by two different session times (9:30-10:20 and 10:30-11:20) with various resources, programs, and ideas shared from area experts in the field media literacy and K-12 education, like:

•  Bill Bass, Parkway School District
•  Linda Dougherty, Northwest School District
•  Mitch Eden, Kirkwood School District

In addition, a media panel will also participate in the discussion from 11:30-12:10. Those participants include:

•  Jasmine Huda, KMOV
•  Alvin Reid, Nine Network, 101 ESPN

GMLP strives to empower citizens to think critically about media messages. Anyone who wants to learn more about media literacy, and network with local media literacy educators and professionals is invited to participate the Mini Conference.

Preregistration is requested by May 24; seating is limited to 60 attendees. Cost for event is $10 (cash) at the door, which covers breakfast and printed materials. For questions regarding the Pedagogy and Production Mini Conference on Media Literacy, contact GMLP ECE co-chairs Rebecca Morrison or Mary Pat Gallagher. Cooperating School Districts is an institutional member of GMLP.