Tag Archives: Constitution Day

Constitution Day 2013: The Ongoing Impact of Gideon v. Wainwright

HEC-TV Constitution Day
HEC-TV’s Constitution Day 2012 – click photo to play

On September 17 at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. CT, HEC-TV presents Constitution Day 2013: The Ongoing Impact of Gideon v. Wainwright. Join HEC-TV from the Thomas F. Eagleton Federal Courthouse in St. Louis to interact with their panel of judges, prosecutors, and public defenders for a vibrant and insightful discussion on the constitutional, legal, political and practical implications of the landmark 1963 U.S. Supreme Court decision in Gideon v. Wainwright.

To find a more detailed program description- which participants can watch online, on TV, or participate via videoconference-  that includes objectives, related national curriculum standards, pre-program learning activities, and information on how to view the program live and participate interactively, click here.

Congressman Carnahan Videoconferences with area Students on Constitution Day

Here are a couple snapshots from today’s Constitution Day videoconference between Mehlville High School and United States Congressman Russ Carnahan. Congressman Carnahan spoke live from Cooperating School Districts via videoconferencing about the US Constitution and how as a member of the House of Representatives he works with the document.

He also took questions from the students, which ranged from where did you go to college (University of Missouri-Columbia), to have you met Barack Obama (yes, they were both elected in 2004- Mr. Obama as a Senator, Mr. Carnahan as a Congressman- and then they met after Obama was elected president). Congressman Carnahan also explained he split his time between St. Louis (he represents Missouri’s Third District, which includes parts of St. Louis City and County, as well as all of Jefferson and Ste. Genevieve Counties) and Washington, D.C. The freshman students from Mehlville asked great questions, and thanks to Mr. Carnahan for taking the time to participate in this distance learning experience.

HEC-TV Live! Constitution Day Videoconferences

HEC-TV Live! is pleased to invite you to join them for their Constitution Day programs on September 17. Produced in conjunction with the Missouri Bar, the two programs will focus on the role of the judiciary, how federal and
state judges are selected, and the philosophic lenses used by judges to
interpret the law.

Your students will have the opportunity to interact with judges currently sitting on the bench of the Missouri Supreme Court and the U.S. Federal District Court for the Eastern District of Missouri.  As always, there are three ways you and your students can join in:  via interactive or view only videoconference, via the web, or on TV.   Our interactive VC spots go quickly, so if you’d like to enroll your students to join us, we hope to hear from you soon.  Remember, there is NO CHARGE to participate in our programs.   To enroll your students or to have us answer any questions you may have, please contact HEC-TV Live!.

Why Judges Matter:  The Selection Process
Presented in collaboration with Missouri Bar
Date: September 17, 2010
Times: 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. CDT
Grade Levels: 7-12
Cost:  No Fee

What is the appointment and confirmation process for federal judges? Are
the processes the same for state and local judges?  Why are some judges
elected and some appointed?  What are the advantages and disadvantages to
the different methods of selection?  How do political forces impact
judicial selection? What does the Constitution have to say on the matter?
Should we consider changes to our process for selecting federal judges?
To explore these questions and more, you’re invited to join our panel of
federal and state judges for a fascinating conversation on the selection
process used to fill federal and state judicial vacancies. Panelists for this program will include Judge Michael Wolff of the Missouri Supreme Court, Judge Rodney W. Sipple of the U.S. Federal District Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Missouri, and Judge Mary Ann Medler, Magistrate Judge for the U.S. District Court Eastern District of Missouri.

More details including a program agenda, pre and post program learning
activities, and curriculum standards can be found here.

Why Judges Matter:  Decisions from the Bench
Presented in collaboration with Missouri Bar
Date: September 17, 2010
Times: 1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. CDT
Grade Levels: 7-12
Cost:  No Fee

Critics and Supreme Court watchers have coined several terms in an attempt
to describe a particular philosophy that a judge may follow in interpreting the law while trying to decide a case.  Some of these terms are judicial restraint, judicial activism, original intent, living document, and literalism.  With every presidential election, one of the issues has become what kind of judge that president will nominate and what kind refers to a nominee’s perceived philosophy.  Without a doubt, the decisions that federal and state judges make are extremely important.  How they make them and why they make them the way they do is a vitally important topic for students to explore.  We invite you to join our panel of federal and state judges for a fascinating conversation about how judges make their decisions and the debate about the various philosophies that arguably affect judicial interpretation.  Panelists for the program will include Judge Stephen Limbaugh, Jr. of the U.S. Federal District Court of Appeals for the Eastern District of Missouri, Judge Mary Rhodes Russell of the Missouri Supreme Court, and Dr. David Robertson, Political Science Department at the University of Missouri-St. Louis.

More details including a program agenda, pre and post program learning
activities, and curriculum standards can be found here.

HEC-TV Live! on Constitution Day 2009

HEC-TV Live!RoundTrips has lined up a couple videoconferences for Constitution Day later this month. Here are the descriptions for September Constitution Day programs- both are: September 17, 2009 | Grade Levels: 7-12 | Cost:  No Fee


HEC-TV Live! Presents Students and the Constitution: Who’s An American Citizen?
Presented in collaboration with The Missouri Bar (10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. CDT)

The 14th amendment states: All persons born or naturalized in the United States, and subject to the jurisdiction thereof, are citizens of the United States and of the State wherein they reside. No State shall make or enforce any law which shall abridge the privileges or immunities of citizens of the United States; nor shall any State deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.

In this amendment the Constitution defines a citizen of the United States and also defines the due process rights of all persons in the country, citizen or non-citizen.  Why did the amendment provide legal protection to all persons and not just citizens? What are the implications of that in light of serious issues today regarding legal aliens, illegal immigration, and terror suspects held at Guantanamo Bay?  What questions and concerns does this raise to lawyers, federal officials and constitutional scholars today?  How do we ensure due process and equal protection for all persons within our nation’s jurisdiction?  What are the implications of trying to do so?  In honor of Constitution Day 2009, we invite you and your students to join our panel of students, attorneys, and school officials for a fascinating conversation on these questions and others as we seek to better understand the Constitution and the important issues of citizenship, due process, and equal protection.

More program details including agenda, standards and related learning activities can be found at www.cilc.org.

HEC-TV Live! Presents Students and the Constitution:  Issues of Juvenile Justice Presented in collaboration with The Missouri Bar (1:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. CDT)

The United States Constitution sets no age of majority for people in the United States to be adjudicated by our legal system.  States establish that age, and in many instances those ages vary not only by state but also within a state for different activities.  For example, juveniles may drive at 16, vote at 18, and drink alcohol at 21.  What guidelines does the Constitution provide for evaluating our system of juvenile justice? What landmark cases have helped determine that point of view?  What are the philosophical differences between our juvenile justice systems and our adult criminal court systems?  What are due process rights for juveniles?  How does one get certified as an adult by the court system?  In honor of Constitution Day 2009, we invite you and your students to join our panel of students, attorneys, and school officials for a fascinating conversation on these questions and others as we seek to better understand the Constitution and the important issues of justice for juveniles.

More program details including agenda, standards and related learning activities can be found at  www.cilc.org.

–> To see how you can connect to these programs, visit the comments section.