Tag Archives: Abraham Lincoln

Abraham Lincoln & the Passage of the Thirteenth Amendment

New Videoconference from HEC-TV Live!:
Abraham Lincoln and the Passage of the Thirteenth Amendment

Date:  March 21, 2013
Times: 10 to 11:00 a.m. or 1 to 2:00 p.m. CDT
Grade Levels: 7-12
Cost:  NO CHARGE
Complete information and registration online

Join us for this exciting exploration.  Ask your questions of archivists and historians & bring history to life!

It’s January 1865.  Abraham Lincoln has just been re-elected President of the United States in November of 1864. With the Union public hoping against hope for an end to the seemingly endless Civil War and results on the battlefield looking to make that result more and more likely, President Lincoln decides to move forward for passage of Thirteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, the historic legislation to end slavery in America.  This program will focus on the story of the passage of this historic legislation.

In conjunction with their upcoming Social Action Campaign, “Stand Tall: Live Like Lincoln,” which kicked off on February 12, Steven Spielberg’s critically acclaimed film Lincoln, a DreamWorks Pictures/Twentieth Century Fox film, in association with Participant Media, will be distributed to all middle and high schools, both public and private, throughout the United States when the film becomes available on DVD.  As part of that initiative, this program will include excerpts from the film Lincoln as well as pre-recorded interview excerpts from Steven Spielberg, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Tony Kushner and others.  Students will also interact with, and ask questions of, Lincoln scholars joining us for the program.

The program will focus on three major areas related to passage of the Thirteenth Amendment. First, we’ll look at Lincoln’s motives for the amendment.  Why did he believe it was necessary when he had already issued the Emancipation Proclamation?  Second, we’ll explore the timing of the historic passage. The Amendment had already passed in the Senate in the spring of 1864 but failed that same spring in the House of Representatives. Flush with re-election victory and an increased number of Republicans elected to the new Congress that was set to start its session in March of 1865, why did Lincoln decide to pursue passage in January 1865 in a lame duck final session of the outgoing Congress rather than waiting until March?  And third, we’ll explore the political process of getting the legislation through the House of Representatives. What deals were made? What politicians made a difference?

The videoconference program will consist of several segments. Student questions and comments for our expert guests will be included in each segment of the program. The program will include excerpts from the film Lincoln as well as pre-recorded interview excerpts from Steven Spielberg, Doris Kearns Goodwin, Tony Kushner and others.

21st Century Approach to Studying History

Today’s HEC-TV LIVE! videoconferences focused on the use of primary sources to explore the impact of Abraham Lincoln’s election as President on the start of America’s Civil War. Tim Gore of HEC-TV was live from the Missouri State Archives office in St. Louis and connected to students in states including Missouri, Oregon, New Jersey, Florida, Texas, Idaho, Pennsylvania. To read about past programs put on by HEC-TV LIVE!, visit these blog links. To watch this afternoon’s show live at 1 o’clock via stream, visit http://live.hectv.org/.

Stories of the Civil War: Lincoln Takes Office from HEC-TV!

Stories of the Civil War: Lincoln Takes Office

Date:  February 10, 2011
Times: 10:00 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. CDT or 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. CDT
Grade Levels: Morning program grades 4-8; Afternoon program grades 6-12
Cost:  NO CHARGE | Register: live@hectv.org

Without a doubt, the Presidential election of 1860 was an historic one. America was living in turbulent times; the debate over slavery was constant and heated; the issue of states rights loomed large. Americans had a number of choices in this historic election, and the candidate that prevailed was Abraham Lincoln.

Who were the candidates of the election and how did people view them? What made Lincoln a galvanizing figure in such different ways for those in the North and those in the South? Why did southern and border states move so quickly to debate secession after his election? What would it have been like to be at those meetings, to hear the debates, to read the headlines daily?

This HEC-TV LIVE! videoconference will focus on the use of primary sources to explore the impact of Abraham Lincoln’s election as President on the start of America’s Civil War. What are the strengths and limitations of such sources? How do they shed a light on history that is different from secondary sources? What stories of people and institutions do they tell?  Students will have many opportunities to interact with the experts involved in the program as well as share ideas and ask questions of each other.

Students will also have many opportunities to interact with primary source documents that take them back in time to the people, places and perspectives of Americans in the winter of 1860-1861.  A highlighted focus of the program will be given to documents demonstrating Missouri as a microcosm of the explosive conversation being held all across the country.

IMPORTANT NOTE:
The 10 a.m. Central Time program is targeted to students in grades 4
through 8. The 1 p.m. Central Time program is targeted to students in
grades 6 through 12. Register with live@hectv.org.

Presidential Videoconferences & Webconferences

There are many options for teachers interested in doing a videoconference on on American Presidents, (especially the Founding Fathers). Here are some programs available for K-12 teachers (all can be found on www.cilc.org):

Another option is webconferencing, which is an interactive connection hosted over the internet, using the classroom computer instead of videoconference equipment. The Education Department of The Hermitage, Andrew Jackson’s home, offers webconferencing on President Jackson and Jacksonian America.