Going Green: Back to Nature from HEC-TV Live! this April

Date:  April 12, 2012 | Times:  10-11:00 a.m. and 1- 2:00 p.m. CDT
Grade Levels: 4-8 | Videoconference Cost:  No Fee
Register: www.cilc.org, search for
HEC-TV Live! Presents Going Green: Back to Nature

Abstract:
Students will learn about the importance of watersheds and what to do to protect them as they participate in a lab activity to test stream water for macro invertebrates & water quality at the Little Creek Nature Area in Florissant, Missouri.

Description:
What are watersheds and why do they matter so much to the health of the planet? How can we know how healthy a watershed is? What are ways to test for water quality? What steps can we take to reduce man’s negative impact on a watershed and help it thrive? What steps can we take to help a watershed struck by a natural disaster? To investigate the questions and more, HEC-TV Live! invites your students to join us outdoors and in the lab at the Little Creek Nature Area in Florissant, Missouri, to learn more about what we can do to protect the watersheds that are so vital to the health of the planet.

During the program, students will participate in a two-part lab activity. Your students will interact with students from the Ferguson-Florissant School District who will join us on site in the lab at the Little Creek Nature Area along with teachers from the Ferguson-Florissant Outdoor Education Center at Little Creek and representatives from the Missouri Department of Conservation. Part 1 of the lab activity will focus on the process used to take water samples from a stream or pond to test for macro invertebrates living in the ecosystem. Together, students will identify samples of macro invertebrates collected from the waters on site, record the number of each type and analyze what these results may indicate about the health of the ecosystem.  Part 2 of the lab activity will focus on testing water for dissolved oxygen, nitrate, phosphate, ph and turbidity. Students at Little Creek will test samples of the water collected on site and interact with your students to analyze the results of those tests.

Members of the Missouri Department of Conservation will answer your student questions about watersheds, water quality, and ways we can help protect both. Preparatory materials both written and in video form, as well as handouts that will be used during the program itself, will be sent to you after your enrollment is confirmed for the program.

Archival Viewing:
Can’t join live?  No problem!  All HEC-TV Live! programs are archived on the station website, www.hectv.org and on the HEC-TV page on iTunes U for on-demand viewing. Archives are usually up & running about a week after the program’s original air date. For questions, contact live@hectv.org.

Advertisements

One thought on “Going Green: Back to Nature from HEC-TV Live! this April

  1. People can join the program live in any of three ways:

    1. Via videoconference–We have interactive and view only videoconference slots available for student groups to join the program. Groups interested in connecting this way will need a videoconference unit at their facility, and we would need to test your connection with our bridge at MOREnet ahead of the program using the IP address you’d use to connect on the program day. Interactive slots get face to face question and answer time with the program guests; view only slots can e-mail questions and comments during the program to live@hectv.org. These slots are limited so early enrollment is highly recommended. For videoconference participation, we must have you enrolled no later than March 7. Contact us at live@hectv.org.

    2. Via Internet–All our HEC-TV Live! programs are streamed live via the station website, http://www.hectv.org, on the program day. For our programs focused on a behind the scenes look at HEC-TV Live! at 10 a.m. and 1 p.m. on March 13 just go to our home page at the program time and the program will run on that page. Since many schools limit streaming video through their firewalls, we recommend testing your ability to view the stream prior to the program by watching one of HEC-TV’s archived programs at http://www.hectv.org. We also recommend viewing the program live on one computer only and connecting that computer to a television or digital projector for classroom viewing. Viewers can e-mail their questions and comments during the program to us at live@hectv.org. To receive curriculum materials designed to help you prepare your students for the program, just e-mail us prior to the program at live@hectv.org.

    3. Via Television–All our programs are available in the St. Louis metropolitan area on HEC-TV, Charter Communications digital channels 989 or 118-26. All our programs can also be seen on AT&T’s U-Verse channel 99. Students viewing in this way can e-mail their questions during the program to live@hectv.org. To view the show live on the program day, just turn on your TV to the appropriate channel.

    For Internet and TV viewing, there is no enrollment deadline date. We would appreciate knowing the time of the program you are watching and the grade level and amount of students involved so we can forward that information to our program partners. Such information is extremely helpful in securing funding for more free, interactive, educational programs in the future. To let us know you’re viewing the program or to answer any additional questions about the program, please contact us at live@hectv.org.

    Program Objectives:
    1. The participant will gain a greater understanding about the nature of our ecosystem and of the role environmental awareness and action takes in maintaining that ecosystem.

    2. The participant will interact with experts involved in watershed maintenance and preservation.

    3. The participant will utilize the process of scientific inquiry to increase his/her knowledge about testing for water quality and analyzing laboratory results of those tests, and then apply that knowledge to make better educated judgments about watershed and ecosystem health.

    Program Format:
    The videoconference program will consist of the following segments. Student questions and comments will be woven into all segments of the program.

    1. Welcome and Introduction—Student groups and experts will be introduced and welcomed to the program.

    2. Context for the Program—Students will see video of the Little Creek Nature Area and the watershed it is part of as we set the stage for the program’s two-part lab activity. Descriptions of what a watershed is will be included as reminder information echoing preparatory materials sent to you in advance of the program.

    3. Lab Activity 1: Testing for Macro Invertebrates—Your students will join students in the lab at the Little Creek Nature Area Outdoor Education Center to identify macro invertebrates found in water samples taken from the Little Creek ecosystem. Handouts to be used in the lab will be sent to you prior to the program. Please make sure students have them accessible to use during the lab. During the lab students will see the process for gathering the water samples and then work with students on site to identify the macro invertebrates found in those samples. Together students will identify the macro invertebrates found and record the number of each. Students will then analyze those results with experts from the Missouri Department of Conservation to offer a hypothesis about the overall quality/health level of the water from which the samples were taken.

    4. Lab Activity 2: Testing of Water Quality for Specific Characteristics—Your students will continue to work with students on site to test the same water samples from Activity 1 for dissolved oxygen, nitrate, phosphate, ph, and turbidity. Handouts to be used in the lab will be sent to you prior to the program. Please make sure students have them accessible to use during the lab. Discussion will then center on the results of the test as students interact with experts from the Missouri Department of Conservation to determine the impact of each element, why it may be at that level in the stream, how that might affect the health of the stream, and what could be done to modify those levels if needed.

    5. Summary and Closing—We’ll summarize the major concepts learned today and seek final questions from students.

    Featured National Standards: (Science)
    Unifying Concepts and Processes – Unifying concepts and processes help students think about and integrate a range of basic ideas which builds an understanding of the natural world
    Systems, order, and organization
    Evidence, models, and explanation

    Science as Inquiry – Science as inquiry requires students to combine processes and scientific knowledge with scientific reasoning and critical thinking to develop their understanding of science.
    1. Abilities necessary to do scientific inquiry
    2. Understandings about scientific inquiry

    Science and Technology – An understanding of science and technology establishes connections between the natural and designed world, linking science and technology.
    Abilities of technological design

    Featured State Standards (Missouri):
    Schools from across the country are invited to join in the program. Missouri state standards are provided for Missouri schools since funding for this program comes from various Missouri organizations.

    Missouri Grade Level Expectations

    Strand 7: Scientific Inquiry
    Science understanding is developed through the use of science process skills, scientific knowledge, scientific investigation, reasoning, and critical thinking

    Participant Preparation:
    1. Participants should come to the program with an interest in science, the environment, and/or related topics.

    2. Participants should utilize preparatory materials provided for the program and other resources of their own to better understand the context of the program’s subject and to think in advance of questions they wish to ask the experts.

    3. Participants should have the lab activity materials sent in advance of the program accessible and ready to use during the program itself. Separate pencil and paper should also be ready to jot down ideas and additional questions as they come to mind.

    Pre-Program Activity Suggestions:

    1. The teacher and students should utilize the pre-program power point and handout materials dealing with macro invertebrates to familiarize themselves with examples of macro invertebrates found in both healthy and unhealthy streams. This knowledge will be helpful as they complete lab activity 1 during the program. The teacher can also choose to utilize similar materials of his/her own to get students ready on this topic as well. After completing preparation in this area, please send us via e-mail two “burning questions” your group has about macro invertebrates that they would like our experts to address during the program. These questions should be sent to us at live@hectv.org no later than the end of the school day on Monday, April 9. We will then go through the questions sent in advance, eliminate overlaps, and then send you a final agenda for the program no later than the morning of April 11. This agenda will include where the selected questions from your student group will fit into the program to be asked. Additional spontaneous questions can also be asked during the program.

    2. The teacher and students should view the video on the Little Creek Nature Area and Watershed sent as part of the program preparatory materials. Use this video to help students develop questions they want to ask during the program about the location itself, steps taken there to protect the ecosystem, etc.

    3. The teacher and student should go over the information dealing with how to test for basic turbidity issues in a stream that was included in the preparatory materials sent in advance of the program. This knowledge will be helpful as they complete lab activity 2 during the program. The teacher can also choose to utilize similar materials of his/her own to get students ready on this topic as well. After completing preparation in this area, please send us via e-mail two “burning questions” your group has about testing for water quality that they would like our experts to address during the program. These questions should be sent to us at live@hectv.org no later than the end of the school day on Monday, April 9. We will then go through the questions sent in advance, eliminate overlaps, and then send you a final agenda for the program no later than the morning of April 11. This agenda will include where the selected questions from your student group will fit into the program to be asked. Additional spontaneous questions can also be asked during the program.

    Post-Program Activity Suggestions:

    1. Have each student journal on what they have learned about topics included in the program hat they did not know before the program. What did they find most interesting, frustrating, unique, etc. about the topic they choose to write on? Have them share their journal entries with a partner or with the teacher.

    2. Check out the educational materials provided by the Missouri Department of Conservation on their website, http://mdc.mo.gov/ and see what topics you’d like to also explore with your students to follow up on some of the concepts explored in this program.

    Program Keywords:

    Environment, watershed, ecosystem, science, environmental, conservation, stream, water quality, turbidity, invertebrate, scientific method, scientific inquiry

    Vocabulary Words and Definitions:

    1. Watershed—A watershed is the area of land where all of the water that is under it or drains off of it goes into the same place. (from the US EPA website)
    2. Ecosystem—An ecosystem is a biological system consisting of all the living organisms or biotic components in a particular area and the nonliving or abiotic component with which the organisms interact, such as air, mineral soil, water and sunlight. (from Wikipidia)
    3. Turbidity— Turbidity is a measure of water clarity how much the material suspended in water decreases the passage of light through the water. Suspended materials include soil particles (clay, silt, and sand), algae, plankton, microbes, and other substances. These materials are typically in the size range of 0.004 mm (clay) to 1.0 mm (sand). Turbidity can affect the color of the water. (from the US EPA website)

    Supplemental Resources:

    http://mdc.mo.gov
    Find additional information and educational materials related to this program at the Missouri Department of Conservation website.

    http://www.epa.gov/
    Excellent information and educational materials related to this program can be found at the website of the United States Environmental Protection Agency.

    Cancellation Policy:

    Since there may well be a waiting list for interactive participation, we ask that you let us know of your need to cancel as soon as you know.

Leave a Reply, Thanks!

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s