HEC-TV Live! Presents Inside the Artist’s Studio: Drummer Boys, Battledrum, and the Civil War

HEC-TV Live! Presents Inside the Artist’s Studio: Drummer Boys, Battledrum, and the Civil War Videoconference — how do you take the world of Civil War drummer boys and create a compelling and meaningful stage production that is also historically accurate?  Meet the directors, designers, and actors from Metro Theater Company and historians from the Missouri Historical Society who are taking on that challenge with the play, Battledrum.

Date:  January 5, 2012 and January 12, 2012
Times: 1:00 to 2:00 p.m. Central Time
Grade Levels:  4-10 | Cost:  FREE | Register

Program Description:
How do you create a compelling & meaningful stage production that is historically accurate?  To find out the answer to this question and more as HEC-TV invites you to meet the directors, designers, and actors from Metro Theater Company and historians from the Missouri Historical Society who are taking on that challenge with the play, Battledrum. For both programs, join them live from the auditorium of the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park where the production will take place.

Both the January 5 and 12 programs will include a tour of the set, question and answers with the director and actors, performance of a short scene from the play, examples of drummer boy drills used both by soldiers as well as in the production, and video showing elements of the Missouri History Museum in Forest Park’s new exhibition, “The Civil War in Missouri.”

The January 12 program will also include the unique opportunity for students to interact with Doug Cooney, playwright of Battledrum. Thus, in addition to the opportunity to meet the actors, designers and historians involved with the production, students will be able to ask questions of the playwright himself about his writing process in general as well as about his creation of this particular play. For this January 12 program, part of the preparatory materials will include a segment from the play for students to read in advance to help them develop questions for Mr. Cooney.

(photo from The U.S. National Archives Flickr stream via Creative Commons)

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