iTouch Technology Leadership

Over twenty educators from the St. Louis area & Arkansas learned how to integrate technology into their teaching and learning using the iPod touch. The Technology Leadership Academy met for their 3rd time today as part of a year long professional development opportunity offered by the VLC at CSD.  This popular academy provides professional development for teacher leaders.  As the participants learn about various technologies, they create an Action Plan for their school or district.   The Action Plan is developed based on the needs of the school, including steps for integrating technology.  Online resources such as Google Docs, Delicious, Diigo & Moodle are used to help collaborate & learn together.

Educators receive an iPod touch as part of the TLA.  Michael Porterfield, Instructor at the University of Missouri, St. Louis assisted in the teaching and learning.  He shared with the participants how to use the iPod touch for email, movies, images & more. Teachers walked away with great ideas for using them in the classroom and as educational leaders in their schools.

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2 thoughts on “iTouch Technology Leadership

  1. I have been using the iPod Touch as the principal delivery tool to teach a practical based Hospitality course at a tertiary institute in New Zealand. We have had two intakes now and the students love the teaching method etc. Although you are right to train, (incredibly, many schools etc are not even doing that,) I would urge you to look hard at the pictures you have used. Everyone sitting in lines, facing the front, heads down! The thing is this; this generation, the ‘digital natives’, don’t learn like this. You have to ask yourself, why are we doing this? Why are we trying to use the iPod? Surely to engage the students, to communicate in a manner closer to that which they ‘get’, to connect. If so, then the question we have to ask ourselves, as educators, is ‘How do these kids want/need to be taught?’ I am almost certain the iPod Touch will be part of that formula, but I am absolutely sure that using it as a replacement for the textbook, or as an enhancement of what we have always done, is not going to cut it. I really think that this is the start of a whole new way of teaching; we have to make sure that we grasp it in both hands with full understanding. You guys have to watch the video ‘No future left behind’ on Youtube. It is a bunch of New York middle schoolers giving it to us with both barrels. It hurts but it rings true!

    Don’t get me wrong; you have my utmost respect for engaging with this fantastic, limitless tool, but you have to look at it with the right perspective or it will not yield the spectacular results I think you already suspect that it is capable of. Don’t sit them down in rows; use groups, use the garden, the park, anywhere there is a network. Use eClicker, (a free app for the students,) to get them teaching each other via Peer Instruction, (a la Eric Mazur, Harvard,) and you will never go back. It is limitless. You probably guessed by now that I don’t get much sleep! I would be happy to communicate and share ideas, in fact I will look forward to it.

    The main thing, of course, is to have fun. Your students will love you for it.

    1. Patrick,
      Thank you for visiting our blog and sharing your insight. We are excited about this new project and are at the beginning stages of implementation. The photos above show the teachers on their second day of learning with their iPod Touch. Many are unfamiliar with the applications and navigation of the equipment, so we have a “technology boot camp” for them to learn more. The TLA is full of technology resources, including the iPod, over the next year the educators will learn more about the integration of this equipment.
      In the St. Louis area, we do not have many schools or educators using these hand-held devices, so we are looking for examples to share. The Virtual Learning Center at CSD is open to other collaboration as well. Please feel free to contact us at http://www.csd.org.

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